DON'T WAIT
FOR THE PLATE

Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST)
in hours instead of days

THE FUTURE OF DIAGNOSTICS

Accurate, rapid, and digital pathogen detection in bodily fluids to indicate in real-time which drugs will be most effective.

OUTLOOK

The U.S market for infectious disease diagnostics exceeds $20 billion annually, providing a significant opportunity for companies that provide more rapid and accurate solutions. Avails technology will serve the existing market by improving existing workflow and time-to-results. Providing physicians with AST results early on to inform their therapeutic decisions is critical to improving health outcomes.

SOLUTION

Avails is developing intuitive, streamlined, standalone applications, all based on its proprietary electrical biosensor platform. Applications will include electrical pathogen quantification, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) and identification of certain forms of resistance expressed in bacteria and fungi. Complimentary to direct rapid organism identification (ID), Avails platform will advance the in-vitro diagnostics market by enabling timely diagnostics-guided therapy, meaningfully reducing the time to most effective and targeted treatment. For the majority of infectious disease diagnoses, Avails is expected to reduce treatment decisions from days to several hours.

THERE ARE MANY MARKETS IN NEED FOR RAPID ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING (AST)

Urinary Tract Infection

Sepsis

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

MRSA

Meningitis

Pharyngitis

Dx-Guided Therapy

Avails Medical is being developed to allow diagnostic-guided therapy

Avails Technology

Time Savings

The platform is being developed to provide actionable results in hours instead of days

A big problem in a big market.

Avails Medical aims to become the world leader in accelerated antibiotic susceptibility testing, starting with the Sepsis (Bacteremia) diagnostics market. Sepsis costs the US healthcare system $24B+ annually, with more than 2 million new cases a year in the US alone. Between 40%-60% of infected people die – far more than the number of U.S. deaths from prostate cancer, breast cancer and AIDS combined.